Mistral. Journal of the Mersea Island Society. 1980 Page 11.

The Pullens of Peldon Rose, by Sybil Brand contd.



In a Deed dated October 1898, conveying three cottages in Peldon from 
Robert Brand to Lily, she was Mrs. Earnest Kinnard of Turnham Green, 
E.J. Kinnard was a licensed victualler. I'm sure Aunt Jane Pullen 
enjoyed if not engineered this match, I'd heard of the ...
Cat1 Books-->Mistral Cat2 Families-->Pullen Cat3 Mersea-->Pubs Cat4 Places-->Peldon

Mistral. Journal of the Mersea Island Society. 1980 Page 11.
The Pullens of Peldon Rose, by Sybil Brand contd.

In a Deed dated October 1898, conveying three cottages in Peldon from Robert Brand to Lily, she was Mrs. Earnest Kinnard of Turnham Green, E.J. Kinnard was a licensed victualler. I'm sure Aunt Jane Pullen enjoyed if not engineered this match, I'd heard of the magnificent nuptials celebrated at West Mersea Parish Church. Lily probably in-whitesatin, I didn't hear that detail, but I did know little bridesmaids carried baskets of flowers and one, if not two, pages wore blue satin breeches and tunics. Whether the 'Pullen family were official guests is debatable but they knew the details.

The next deed, dated February 1908, conveys these cottages from Lily to her mother for £100. Incidentally one of the said cottages, now empty, had been tenanted by Samuel Pooley, a Blacksmith. He had moved to Romford to find a better market and was father-in-law later of a great friend of mine.

Lily's name has changed. E.J. Kinnard died 2nd May 1904 and on 18th July 1905 Mrs,Kinnard became Mrs. Harry Chas. Eldred. Her second husband was another licensed victualler of "The Prince Blucher' Twickenham, no doubt named after Field Marshal Blucher who reinforced Wellington to win the Battle of Waterloo. Only a year and two months after her first husband's death; her mourning didn't last long according to custom then. I've a feeling this match wasn't as splendid financially as the first. Aunt Jane did not approve, hence the silence at Uncle George's graveside,. After years the breach was healed. Lily and her two children, Eldreds, came to Peldon Rose for holidays.

Until I was ten we lived in Mersea and were sometimes visited by Aunt Jane. I remember her black silk coat, high heels and smart toque. She had a black beady eye and would say 'Pullens are no good at business.' Do we want a world of good business men only? Pullens were in a different tradition. They played old-fashioned guitars, not electric, two were violinists, Joseph had a fine tenor voice. Uncle Ben sang bass. The daughters sang and Joseph's two daughters were both musical, one a professional soprano, Christine Royle, and the other a first-class accompanist. Grandfather George and his sons had French blood in their veins. They were seed growers and carpeted their fields with glorious patches of colour, Lavatera, Primulas, Eschcholtzias, double Canterbury Bells and the unobtrusive Mignonette. Uncle Joseph always tried to trap his nieces with the spelling of eschcholtzias but we knew it! (To-day's accepted spelling = eschscholzia.)
One other delightful memory of Uncle Isaac Pullen, Oyster Merchant, of Hoo, Kent. Mother and I, a girl of twelve, went by steamer from Southend Pier up the Medway to stay at Hoo in the hot August of 1911.

I was puzzled, there wasn't much garden cultivated but Uncle Isaac owned five watering cans, and I saw no gardening done by him. Beached below the house was a huge ex Admiralty gig; not much use, even I knew, for working oyster layings.

Uncle Isaac was a devotee of surplus Admiralty sales at Sheerness and with his bargains he picked up shall we say 'others extraneously,' hence the five watering cans.

Forty or more years ago I read an article in an illustrated London weekly by Hannen Swaffer, one of the many written of Peldon Rose and the two Romano-British Chieftains who still, so they say, can be heard fighting on the Strood, with clash of armour and ring of steel, at night. That was inspired by Mrs. Jane Fallen. She was as good as any man in keeping an orderly house. None could withstand the glance of that sharp eye, and, until Ivan was old enough to succeed her, she held the reins.

So Ivan was the last of 'The Pullens of Peldon Rose.'
Date: 1980      


Photo: Mersea Museum - Rose and Len Harvey Collection
Image ID MIS_1980_111
Category 2 Families-->Pullen
Category 3 Mersea-->Pubs
Category 4 Places-->Peldon

This image is part of the Mersea Island Museum Collection.