ID FBP / Willoughby John Bean

TitleBean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
AbstractA notebook with biographies of many members of the Bean family, mostly from WJB's memory of them. There is also a good description of farming at the time.

Probably written out by someone else, as it is dated January 1939 and WJB died October 1938.

To try to fit the names into a simple Bean Family tree, see AFM_FBN .
These notes complement History of the Bean Family by Catherine Francis Burgess née Bean (CFB).

The booklet has been loaned to the Museum by the Brook family - the family lived in West Mersea Hall in the 1950s - as had WJB many years earlier.

Accession No. 2019.01.003A

AuthorWilloughby John Bean
SourceMersea Museum
IDFBP
Related Images:
 The Hall, West Mersea. Postcard tucked in Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean.
</p><p>Accession No. 2019.01.003B</p>  FBP_101
ImageID:   FBP_101
Title: The Hall, West Mersea. Postcard tucked in Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean.

Accession No. 2019.01.003B

Date:1908
Source:Mersea Museum
 The Hall, West Mersea. Postcard tucked in Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean.
 On the picture of The Hall that I have is a message to my Mom & Dad.
 My Dear Park and Lue I thought you would like to keep in remembrance of Uncle John Bean when you saw the big Turkey.
 signed J.B.
 J.B. was my fathers uncle Josiah Bacon and John was uncle to J.B. and my fathers mother.
 Yours truly E.L.K.  FBP_102
ImageID:   FBP_102
Title: The Hall, West Mersea. Postcard tucked in Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean.
"On the picture of The Hall that I have is a message to my Mom & Dad.
My Dear Park and Lue I thought you would like to keep in remembrance of Uncle John Bean when you saw the big Turkey.
signed J.B.
J.B. was my fathers uncle Josiah Bacon and John was uncle to J.B. and my fathers mother.
Yours truly E.L.K.
Date:1908
Source:Mersea Museum
 Death of Mr Willoughby John Bean. Historian of Mersea Island.
 It is with regret we have to record the death of Mr Willoughby John Bean, of Zeitoun, Seaview Avenue.
 ...
 On Tuesday a tradesman calling ... made an entry and found that Mr Bean had passed away.
 ...
 The funeral took place at Ipswich yesterday (Friday), where Mr Maurice Thorp, a life-long friend of the deceased, carried out the funeral arrangements.  DM1_AB2_048_001
ImageID:   DM1_AB2_048_001
Title: Death of Mr Willoughby John Bean. Historian of Mersea Island.
It is with regret we have to record the death of Mr Willoughby John Bean, of Zeitoun, Seaview Avenue.
...
On Tuesday a tradesman calling ... made an entry and found that Mr Bean had passed away.
...
The funeral took place at Ipswich yesterday (Friday), where Mr Maurice Thorp, a life-long friend of the deceased, carried out the funeral arrangements.
Date:5 November 1938
Source:Mersea Museum / David Mussett Collection
 Bean Family History by WJB.
 Copy of Family History collected and written by W. J. Bean of West Mersea.
 [Willoughby John Bean died 30 October 1938]  FBP_006
ImageID:   FBP_006
Title: Bean Family History by WJB.
Copy of Family History collected and written by W. J. Bean of West Mersea.
[Willoughby John Bean died 30 October 1938]
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by WJB
 I wrote the accompanying history for Bessie thinking she would like to hear something of the sort and knowing she had already some account from Janet Burton and elsewhere though she had only learned the good parts particularly of the first Willoughby and his descendents and as well the Australian Branch. She however did not altogether approve of my allusion to the mode of getting a living which ...
</p>  FBP_008
ImageID:   FBP_008
Title: Bean Family History by WJB
I wrote the accompanying history for Bessie thinking she would like to hear something of the sort and knowing she had already some account from Janet Burton and elsewhere though she had only learned the good parts particularly of the first Willoughby and his descendents and as well the Australian Branch. She however did not altogether approve of my allusion to the mode of getting a living which ...

Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by WJB
 some of our forefathers had to practice (it was pride which spoilt the show with Alexander's family and I am sorry to say ours too) it seems queer that a man must not make garments, that is trade, but he may as a farmer, clean out pigsties. That is the profession of agriculture. Since writing this I have learned more and add a few notes.
</p><p>
Mac of the Hills, Mac Ben, Mac Beau, Bean.
 Grant is the premier Clan of Scotland, the eldest son has alway been called James except once when one of them married a Miss Bean, daughter of John Bean and the eldest son was named John in recognition of the honour in linking the two families. I think this John Bean must have been the one who was ...  FBP_010
ImageID:   FBP_010
Title: Bean Family History by WJB
some of our forefathers had to practice (it was pride which spoilt the show with Alexander's family and I am sorry to say ours too) it seems queer that a man must not make garments, that is trade, but he may as a farmer, clean out pigsties. That is the profession of agriculture. Since writing this I have learned more and add a few notes.

Mac of the Hills, Mac Ben, Mac Beau, Bean.
Grant is the premier Clan of Scotland, the eldest son has alway been called James except once when one of them married a Miss Bean, daughter of John Bean and the eldest son was named John in recognition of the honour in linking the two families. I think this John Bean must have been the one who was ...

Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by WJB
 Physician to one of the King Charles.
 The Mac Duffs one of whose daughters married a Bean are one of the prominent clans with whom our own Royalty have married. (the late Duke of Fife)
 Sir Mountstuart Grant Duff who was an East Indian Judge when he retired to Colchester (about 1896) and lived and died at London Park, he was then very image of our Father a year or two before he died. It is from the Duffs that the occasional auburn head of curly hair crops out.
 Sir Mount Stuart had it, our Father, Gerty's boy and John Bean of Australia alike.
 I. It was a mistake to say that there was another John this John was father to Alexander, our Great, Grandfather - he may have had estates in Banff, but I  FBP_012
ImageID:   FBP_012
Title: Bean Family History by WJB
Physician to one of the King Charles.
The Mac Duffs one of whose daughters married a Bean are one of the prominent clans with whom our own Royalty have married. (the late Duke of Fife)
Sir Mountstuart Grant Duff who was an East Indian Judge when he retired to Colchester (about 1896) and lived and died at London Park, he was then very image of our Father a year or two before he died. It is from the Duffs that the occasional auburn head of curly hair crops out.
Sir Mount Stuart had it, our Father, Gerty's boy and John Bean of Australia alike.
I. It was a mistake to say that there was another John this John was father to Alexander, our Great, Grandfather - he may have had estates in Banff, but I
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by WJB
 doubt it, it is more likely that his ancestors did, but there are documents that show that after Alexander and James had made their way in London, they sent money to John Bean at Aberdeen, there is for instance a wine bill of John's which James paid.
 2. Cornelia was James Bean's wife, there was a Lieutenant Barlow (retired) who lived at Harrogate, his mother seems to have married a second time and had by her second husband, Mr Percival, two if not three daughters who remained single and one who married Dawson Drake (I think). Barlow was father to Cornelia, James Bean married Cornelia Barlow and had tow daughters Jane and Sophia, one of whom married the Rev. Strong, the other married Rev. Roberts, these two girls as children were said to be delicate and not expected ...  FBP_014
ImageID:   FBP_014
Title: Bean Family History by WJB
doubt it, it is more likely that his ancestors did, but there are documents that show that after Alexander and James had made their way in London, they sent money to John Bean at Aberdeen, there is for instance a wine bill of John's which James paid.
2. Cornelia was James Bean's wife, there was a Lieutenant Barlow (retired) who lived at Harrogate, his mother seems to have married a second time and had by her second husband, Mr Percival, two if not three daughters who remained single and one who married Dawson Drake (I think). Barlow was father to Cornelia, James Bean married Cornelia Barlow and had tow daughters Jane and Sophia, one of whom married the Rev. Strong, the other married Rev. Roberts, these two girls as children were said to be delicate and not expected ...
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by WJB
 to grow up, but they did, Alexander was therefore their Uncle and trustee for them of James money and he was also trustee of Barlow's money which the two girls also had and it is noticeable that Dawson Drake who first helped James Bean and afterwards was helped by James returned this money, when James Bean died in India - was I expect partner with Drake robbing his dead partner and then dying himself his property went to Barlow and he also dying soon after and Cornelia Bean being also dead all the money went to their two girls. When Barlow died the act was still in force that nothing but wool might be used for grave clothes - in order to help English sheep farmers and there are bills & certificate which Alexander Bean paid.
 3. James made great friends with Sir George Pocock and his lady and knew what he was about in marrying Miss Barlow but he did not live many years after and died in ...  FBP_016
ImageID:   FBP_016
Title: Bean Family History by WJB
to grow up, but they did, Alexander was therefore their Uncle and trustee for them of James money and he was also trustee of Barlow's money which the two girls also had and it is noticeable that Dawson Drake who first helped James Bean and afterwards was helped by James returned this money, when James Bean died in India - was I expect partner with Drake robbing his dead partner and then dying himself his property went to Barlow and he also dying soon after and Cornelia Bean being also dead all the money went to their two girls. When Barlow died the act was still in force that nothing but wool might be used for grave clothes - in order to help English sheep farmers and there are bills & certificate which Alexander Bean paid.
3. James made great friends with Sir George Pocock and his lady and knew what he was about in marrying Miss Barlow but he did not live many years after and died in ...
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 [ James Bean contd. ]
 India of a fever, he must have got into a good position as he had partners in a firm in Hatton Gardens, I think the name was Muriatti dealing in precious stones etc which James bought in his trading India to Cochin China Etc.
 4-5. I think Alexander came to London before James, they had very little money, but had the Scotch education which was always a better business education than the English., Alexander obtained a post as bookkeeper with a Mrs Dickenson who was a Frenchman probably a tailor before he came to England and a Huguenot refugee - In George II time swarms of refugees were welcomed to England by the King whose policy was to get them here to work up the wool which was then England's chief produce, and these people also grew flax and made it up with the wool - at Colchester  FBP_018
ImageID:   FBP_018
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
[ James Bean contd. ]
India of a fever, he must have got into a good position as he had partners in a firm in Hatton Gardens, I think the name was Muriatti dealing in precious stones etc which James bought in his trading India to Cochin China Etc.
4-5. I think Alexander came to London before James, they had very little money, but had the Scotch education which was always a better business education than the English., Alexander obtained a post as bookkeeper with a Mrs Dickenson who was a Frenchman probably a tailor before he came to England and a Huguenot refugee - In George II time swarms of refugees were welcomed to England by the King whose policy was to get them here to work up the wool which was then England's chief produce, and these people also grew flax and made it up with the wool - at Colchester
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 two particular kinds of cloth - restored Colchester and the surrounding county to wealth. I do not remember Dickenson's French name, Bessie knows it and did tell me but I did not make a note of it and have forgotten. However he took the English name, he had a tailors business in Whitechapel and contracted with Army Officers to clothe whole regiments with practically everything except guns and ammunition, he also lent money by by lending to officers no doubt obtained his contracts, there was just as much graft there as now - Alexander soon became his right hand man of business and a good business it was. Dickenson latterly took from £20 to £30 out of it every week and sometimes more, he had a son who was brought up and practised as a layer in the Lincolns Inn Fields. There is no record of the lawyer after his father's death, Alexander ...  FBP_020
ImageID:   FBP_020
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
two particular kinds of cloth - restored Colchester and the surrounding county to wealth. I do not remember Dickenson's French name, Bessie knows it and did tell me but I did not make a note of it and have forgotten. However he took the English name, he had a tailors business in Whitechapel and contracted with Army Officers to clothe whole regiments with practically everything except guns and ammunition, he also lent money by by lending to officers no doubt obtained his contracts, there was just as much graft there as now - Alexander soon became his right hand man of business and a good business it was. Dickenson latterly took from £20 to £30 out of it every week and sometimes more, he had a son who was brought up and practised as a layer in the Lincolns Inn Fields. There is no record of the lawyer after his father's death, Alexander ...
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 controlled the business before then, had married the daughter Ann Dickenson, and succeeded to the business at the death of Dickenson. I have a photograph of a portrait of Mrs Ann Bean, there is no doubt she was considered handsome and being well off moved in what is considered good society.
 5. A Colonel Watson became a general, he had a son and two daughters and somehow when he died he had exhausted his money and left his daughters very very poor there are some heartrending letters to their Cousin S.E. Bean for help; the sons who at this time was a Captain in the army and a widower, left his own child to the care of these sisters, and seems to have been at that time a waster was court martialled but got off somehow an afterwards became a General (I think) eventually went to Ceylon, married again, grew tea or coffee had a larger family (I cannot remember if it was 12 or 24).  FBP_022
ImageID:   FBP_022
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
controlled the business before then, had married the daughter Ann Dickenson, and succeeded to the business at the death of Dickenson. I have a photograph of a portrait of Mrs Ann Bean, there is no doubt she was considered handsome and being well off moved in what is considered good society.
5. A Colonel Watson became a general, he had a son and two daughters and somehow when he died he had exhausted his money and left his daughters very very poor there are some heartrending letters to their Cousin S.E. Bean for help; the sons who at this time was a Captain in the army and a widower, left his own child to the care of these sisters, and seems to have been at that time a waster was court martialled but got off somehow an afterwards became a General (I think) eventually went to Ceylon, married again, grew tea or coffee had a larger family (I cannot remember if it was 12 or 24).
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 6. Harriot. Alexander's eldest daughter was evidently a sparkler and father's pet; married at nineteen to Rev. Percival Burton, an Army Chaplain, I doubt if he had any Capital. I think Alexander settled on her some considerable sum in the 3% Consols of the day. In those days a wife's money belonged to the husband unless he agreed to a deed of settlement and there was trouble over this, Burton and Harriot were actually on board the army transport at (I think) Portsmouth and the lawyer only got his signature by going off to the ship. There was also the reversion of two livings in Hampshire which Alexander bought for Burton against the time when the then incumbent should die and Burton could leave the servie - I guess Burton stuck to the service in both Indies mostly, the society suited Harriot no doubt, not sure if Burton ever took over his livings, it is more probable he sold them, and I do not know where or when he died but Harriot was living for several years on the outskirts of London and after at either Bath or Cheltenham, her son Percival ...  FBP_024
ImageID:   FBP_024
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
6. Harriot. Alexander's eldest daughter was evidently a sparkler and father's pet; married at nineteen to Rev. Percival Burton, an Army Chaplain, I doubt if he had any Capital. I think Alexander settled on her some considerable sum in the 3% Consols of the day. In those days a wife's money belonged to the husband unless he agreed to a deed of settlement and there was trouble over this, Burton and Harriot were actually on board the army transport at (I think) Portsmouth and the lawyer only got his signature by going off to the ship. There was also the reversion of two livings in Hampshire which Alexander bought for Burton against the time when the then incumbent should die and Burton could leave the servie - I guess Burton stuck to the service in both Indies mostly, the society suited Harriot no doubt, not sure if Burton ever took over his livings, it is more probable he sold them, and I do not know where or when he died but Harriot was living for several years on the outskirts of London and after at either Bath or Cheltenham, her son Percival ...
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 Percival was another Army Chaplin stationed for some years in the West Indies. Harriot had two daughters, I cannot remember other sons and if Richard and Cuthbert were grandsons of hers. I do not think they could have been sons. When her mother Mrs Ann Bean died at Brentwood Harriot had another £2,000 and she was trying to get more, her brother Willoughby said a few things.
 Harriot was the only one who married during the lifetime of her father Alexander. She had as I say £2,000 when her mother died, this was only because he son Percival let her do so by renouncing his claim in her favour, as I have said elsewhere at that time the married womans property act was not yet made and husbands were entitled to any property coming to their wives unless such property had been settled on them by trust deeds, and in the same way the sum of £2,000 which would Harriot's husband would have claimed if he had been alive, went by law to his eldest son Percival, another £2,000 went to Watson whose wife Emily ...  FBP_026
ImageID:   FBP_026
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
Percival was another Army Chaplin stationed for some years in the West Indies. Harriot had two daughters, I cannot remember other sons and if Richard and Cuthbert were grandsons of hers. I do not think they could have been sons. When her mother Mrs Ann Bean died at Brentwood Harriot had another £2,000 and she was trying to get more, her brother Willoughby said a few things.
Harriot was the only one who married during the lifetime of her father Alexander. She had as I say £2,000 when her mother died, this was only because he son Percival let her do so by renouncing his claim in her favour, as I have said elsewhere at that time the married womans property act was not yet made and husbands were entitled to any property coming to their wives unless such property had been settled on them by trust deeds, and in the same way the sum of £2,000 which would Harriot's husband would have claimed if he had been alive, went by law to his eldest son Percival, another £2,000 went to Watson whose wife Emily ...
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 Emily Ann Bean, daughter of Alexander was dead.
</p><p>7. John the eldest son was still not grown up when Alexander died, his mother the widow usually known as Mrs Ann Bean who had always been accustomed to having plenty of money was one of those ladies who lived for society and position with great predilections for the army, having married Harriot to an Army Chaplain and Emily Ann to a Colonel let John have a run she gave him I think £10 a month pocket money. He joined an Infantry Regiment.
</p><p>8. 9. William, I could only find one mention of him, a note of payment to him of one instalment of pocket money, I think it was £50 and do not feel at all sure if it should have read Willoughby instead of William.
</p><p>Willoughby was evidently a finely built young man for he got into the Coldstream Guards, his mother paid £900  FBP_028
ImageID:   FBP_028
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
Emily Ann Bean, daughter of Alexander was dead.

7. John the eldest son was still not grown up when Alexander died, his mother the widow usually known as Mrs Ann Bean who had always been accustomed to having plenty of money was one of those ladies who lived for society and position with great predilections for the army, having married Harriot to an Army Chaplain and Emily Ann to a Colonel let John have a run she gave him I think £10 a month pocket money. He joined an Infantry Regiment.

8. 9. William, I could only find one mention of him, a note of payment to him of one instalment of pocket money, I think it was £50 and do not feel at all sure if it should have read Willoughby instead of William.

Willoughby was evidently a finely built young man for he got into the Coldstream Guards, his mother paid £900

Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by WJB
[ Willoughby Bean contd. ]
 for his commission Cornet. He was taken prisoner in France and afterwards settled in France and father to the Rev. Alexander Bean of Sowerby Yorks and of Major Jack Bean of Bath and of Charlotte and Henrietta, both of whom I remember staying at Peldon. when I was a kiddy. 
 Willoughby had his £2,000 when his mother died, as did his sister Louisa (the youngest except Samuel Edwin) who did not marry but took care of her mother when having spent all the capital left her by Alexander except the £10,000 3½% Consols as to which she could only touch the interest, she had to leave London where she lived in Broad St. after leaving Wanstead.
 I believe Willoughby married the daughter of a General - Bessie knows the name.
</p><p>11. Alexander had without doubt a fine business with ...  FBP_030
ImageID:   FBP_030
Title: Bean Family History by WJB [ Willoughby Bean contd. ]
for his commission Cornet. He was taken prisoner in France and afterwards settled in France and father to the Rev. Alexander Bean of Sowerby Yorks and of Major Jack Bean of Bath and of Charlotte and Henrietta, both of whom I remember staying at Peldon. when I was a kiddy.
Willoughby had his £2,000 when his mother died, as did his sister Louisa (the youngest except Samuel Edwin) who did not marry but took care of her mother when having spent all the capital left her by Alexander except the £10,000 3½% Consols as to which she could only touch the interest, she had to leave London where she lived in Broad St. after leaving Wanstead.
I believe Willoughby married the daughter of a General - Bessie knows the name.

11. Alexander had without doubt a fine business with ...

Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 [ Alexander contd. ]
good income but latterly he had bad health. He seems to have moved to Wanstead near Epping, I do not think he disposed of the business then as there were some accounts of the exectorship, Mrs Bean and a friend a Mr Kinnard.
 Kinnard seems to have been a chemist, with as in those days a clientele of ladies who had their hair dressed and a stock of cosmetics. In Mrs Ann Bean's diary there are frequent items of this for preparing the two girls Emily and Louisa for balls and Kinnard's bills were larger than the school bills for Samuel Edwin.
 amongst other things Willoughby Lacy owed Mrs Bean after Alexander died £5,000 for loans and Mrs Bean was eventually glad to take £500 for this Lacy was a bad lot. Alexander died at Wanstead and his tombstone was in evidence 40 years ago.  FBP_032
ImageID:   FBP_032
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
[ Alexander contd. ] good income but latterly he had bad health. He seems to have moved to Wanstead near Epping, I do not think he disposed of the business then as there were some accounts of the exectorship, Mrs Bean and a friend a Mr Kinnard.
Kinnard seems to have been a chemist, with as in those days a clientele of ladies who had their hair dressed and a stock of cosmetics. In Mrs Ann Bean's diary there are frequent items of this for preparing the two girls Emily and Louisa for balls and Kinnard's bills were larger than the school bills for Samuel Edwin.
amongst other things Willoughby Lacy owed Mrs Bean after Alexander died £5,000 for loans and Mrs Bean was eventually glad to take £500 for this Lacy was a bad lot. Alexander died at Wanstead and his tombstone was in evidence 40 years ago.
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 [ buried Wanstead contd. ]
'tho I was never able to go there. Mrs Ann Bean was buried there, her funeral from Brentwood cost £60. Louisa was also buried there, her funeral from Peldon cost £30. 
</p><p>
Samuel Edwin the youngest of Alexanders family was a schoolboy when his father died, and there is no mention that I can find of his mother spending money on him other than the school bills, bue he evidently was like his mother and father - resolute and with commercial instincts.
<bR>He ran away with his wife Miss Green - I guess but do not know that old Green who was in business with Alexander, his son who had a tailoring business afterwarsd made the uniform for our Uncle Joseph Alfred Bean when He became an army doctor, in those days the Greens were Roan Catholics.
 When S.E. Bean married [1808] his friend Billy Newman was agent for W. Quincey and he turned over to S.E. Bean the agency as well as the tenancy of New Hall, Little Wigborough and which was very very generous.  FBP_034
ImageID:   FBP_034
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
[ buried Wanstead contd. ] 'tho I was never able to go there. Mrs Ann Bean was buried there, her funeral from Brentwood cost £60. Louisa was also buried there, her funeral from Peldon cost £30.

Samuel Edwin the youngest of Alexanders family was a schoolboy when his father died, and there is no mention that I can find of his mother spending money on him other than the school bills, bue he evidently was like his mother and father - resolute and with commercial instincts.
He ran away with his wife Miss Green - I guess but do not know that old Green who was in business with Alexander, his son who had a tailoring business afterwarsd made the uniform for our Uncle Joseph Alfred Bean when He became an army doctor, in those days the Greens were Roan Catholics.
When S.E. Bean married [1808] his friend Billy Newman was agent for W. Quincey and he turned over to S.E. Bean the agency as well as the tenancy of New Hall, Little Wigborough and which was very very generous.

Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 When S.E. Bean married [1808] his friend Billy Newman was agent for W. Quincey and he turned over to S.E. Bean the agency as well as the tenancy of New Hall, Little Wigborough and which was very very generous. farming on heavy land did not require much tuition in those days. Samuel Edwin Bean moved from New Hall to Peldon Hall at some date subsequent to 1827.
I do not know how many of his children were born at Wigborough but they were all brought up at Peldon, neither do I know precisely the order in which they were born, but it was something like this - Edwin Samuel (note the names are transposed in this case), John, Henry, William Newman, Fanny (Mrs Carter), Emily (spinster lived to be 96 was considered delicate in her young time and always wor a shawl to my recollection) Willoughby (helped S.E.B. in his last years to farm and farmed Peldon Hall for one year on his own after S.E.B. died and then died himself ...  FBP_036
ImageID:   FBP_036
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
When S.E. Bean married [1808] his friend Billy Newman was agent for W. Quincey and he turned over to S.E. Bean the agency as well as the tenancy of New Hall, Little Wigborough and which was very very generous. farming on heavy land did not require much tuition in those days. Samuel Edwin Bean moved from New Hall to Peldon Hall at some date subsequent to 1827. I do not know how many of his children were born at Wigborough but they were all brought up at Peldon, neither do I know precisely the order in which they were born, but it was something like this - Edwin Samuel (note the names are transposed in this case), John, Henry, William Newman, Fanny (Mrs Carter), Emily (spinster lived to be 96 was considered delicate in her young time and always wor a shawl to my recollection) Willoughby (helped S.E.B. in his last years to farm and farmed Peldon Hall for one year on his own after S.E.B. died and then died himself ...
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 [Children of Samuel Edwin Bean contd]
 and then died himself a girl who died young whose name I am not certain but think she was called Louise, Alexander, our father, and Joseph Alfred the last.
 Samuel Edwin had about the year 1835 a good deal to arrange for Mrs Quincey the various agreements for valuation and apportionment of tithes of the various properties of hers and the parishes in which they were situated and under that tithe act which fixed, first the apportionment or amount per acre on the various fields or collection of fields called farms and then a sliding scale based on the average price of corn over each period of seven years, all of which worked out as that tithes fluctuated in amount but made them more - definitely the property of the tithe owner. Farming was a simple business in those days and especially on heavy lands were sheep were seldom kept, it was not so much internsive farming with good weatherproof building, well made farmyard ...  FBP_038
ImageID:   FBP_038
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
[Children of Samuel Edwin Bean contd]
and then died himself a girl who died young whose name I am not certain but think she was called Louise, Alexander, our father, and Joseph Alfred the last.
Samuel Edwin had about the year 1835 a good deal to arrange for Mrs Quincey the various agreements for valuation and apportionment of tithes of the various properties of hers and the parishes in which they were situated and under that tithe act which fixed, first the apportionment or amount per acre on the various fields or collection of fields called farms and then a sliding scale based on the average price of corn over each period of seven years, all of which worked out as that tithes fluctuated in amount but made them more - definitely the property of the tithe owner. Farming was a simple business in those days and especially on heavy lands were sheep were seldom kept, it was not so much internsive farming with good weatherproof building, well made farmyard ...
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 yard manure, Cattle were fattened on bean meal, pigs on barley meal, no oilcake, no artificial manures, mangolds were only just introduced and not cultivated much, a few swedes turnip.
 The system was to fallow and hoe and generally keep the crops clean and take such growth as the season provided an as the wretched labourers lived on coarse bread, port and pease pudding hot, pease pudding cold, pease pudding in the pot, nine days old, the cultivation was cheap, prices were high and profits large.
 S.E. Bean supported church and state and the militia of which he was a Captain and he brought up his family to do the same and as he had 10 of them there was not much money spent on education for either business or profession.  FBP_040
ImageID:   FBP_040
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
yard manure, Cattle were fattened on bean meal, pigs on barley meal, no oilcake, no artificial manures, mangolds were only just introduced and not cultivated much, a few swedes turnip.
The system was to fallow and hoe and generally keep the crops clean and take such growth as the season provided an as the wretched labourers lived on coarse bread, port and pease pudding hot, pease pudding cold, pease pudding in the pot, nine days old, the cultivation was cheap, prices were high and profits large.
S.E. Bean supported church and state and the militia of which he was a Captain and he brought up his family to do the same and as he had 10 of them there was not much money spent on education for either business or profession.
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 [S.E. Bean contd.]
 and I expect he saw that the army was no use without spending money in addition to pay, so his boys, except three, were just brought up to work or farm, that is Edwin, Henry, William and Willoughby, they all began and those four finished their education in a school kept by an old chap named Haxell, brother to a working Farmer who lived at Haxells Farm in Peldon on the Colchester Road. The two Haxells being able to read and write fairly well and above the average farmer of the times were the overseers of the parish, an official position which placed them above their neighbours. The school which one of them kept was at the bottom of the hill from the Hall gates on the Mersea Road, a corner double cottage all my time and Haxell's reputation was so good that boys as far as Layer de la Haye came over daily to be taught.  FBP_042
ImageID:   FBP_042
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
[S.E. Bean contd.]
and I expect he saw that the army was no use without spending money in addition to pay, so his boys, except three, were just brought up to work or farm, that is Edwin, Henry, William and Willoughby, they all began and those four finished their education in a school kept by an old chap named Haxell, brother to a working Farmer who lived at Haxells Farm in Peldon on the Colchester Road. The two Haxells being able to read and write fairly well and above the average farmer of the times were the overseers of the parish, an official position which placed them above their neighbours. The school which one of them kept was at the bottom of the hill from the Hall gates on the Mersea Road, a corner double cottage all my time and Haxell's reputation was so good that boys as far as Layer de la Haye came over daily to be taught.
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 John, Alexander and Joseph also went to school at Haxells but John and Joseph had advantages, some money was found to train and apprentice them to the medical profession. I do not think our Father had any other direct scholastic education but of him later; Edwin Samuel, I have heard our father say that Edwin had the best start off of any of his brothers at any rate when I was about ten years old I remember he had Waldegrave and Decoy Farm at West Mersea - probably 150 acres - also the Church and Strood Lands, another 50 or 60 acres, but he loved the water and at some period of his life in Mersea he had a smack and with an old fellow named Gentry, who was half a fisherman and half a boats carpenter, he used to buy winkles, eels etc. take them by water to Billingsgate and sell in the ...  FBP_044
ImageID:   FBP_044
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
John, Alexander and Joseph also went to school at Haxells but John and Joseph had advantages, some money was found to train and apprentice them to the medical profession. I do not think our Father had any other direct scholastic education but of him later; Edwin Samuel, I have heard our father say that Edwin had the best start off of any of his brothers at any rate when I was about ten years old I remember he had Waldegrave and Decoy Farm at West Mersea - probably 150 acres - also the Church and Strood Lands, another 50 or 60 acres, but he loved the water and at some period of his life in Mersea he had a smack and with an old fellow named Gentry, who was half a fisherman and half a boats carpenter, he used to buy winkles, eels etc. take them by water to Billingsgate and sell in the ...
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 [ Edwin Samuel Bean contd. ]
 open street or market there to the London Street hawkers. He was a tall spare man with a rich, round voice and I can quite believe as old fishermen have told me that he could easily attract attention as he called Who'l buy, Here's your Maldon Clays meaning winkles grown and caught on the flats of Maldon river. He had a big punt gun known on the Blackwater as Teddy Bean's gun - also worked the Decoy for ducks in season. He was a bachelor all his life, retired when he was getting old, lived in a cottage farm at Stock afterwards alone in a cottage near or in Ingatestone, crocked up all at once, was taken to Ongar and died there at his brother Henry's. I doubt if he had anything left when he died, if so Uncle Henry had it - he was buried at Ongar.
 John, after leaving Haxells I do not know what other ...  FBP_046
ImageID:   FBP_046
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
[ Edwin Samuel Bean contd. ]
open street or market there to the London Street hawkers. He was a tall spare man with a rich, round voice and I can quite believe as old fishermen have told me that he could easily attract attention as he called "Who'l buy, Here's your Maldon Clays" meaning winkles grown and caught on the flats of Maldon river. He had a big punt gun known on the Blackwater as "Teddy Bean's gun" - also worked the Decoy for ducks in season. He was a bachelor all his life, retired when he was getting old, lived in a cottage farm at Stock afterwards alone in a cottage near or in Ingatestone, crocked up all at once, was taken to Ongar and died there at his brother Henry's. I doubt if he had anything left when he died, if so Uncle Henry had it - he was buried at Ongar.
John, after leaving Haxells I do not know what other ...
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 John Bean, after leaving Haxells I do not know what other tuition he had meanwhile was apprenticed to a doctor at Colchester at a premium of £400. The doctor's name was Went and he became somehow bankrupt and there was considerable difficulty in getting back from the trustee a part of the premium. After that arrangements were made for John to go to Dr Butler at Brentwood and when he had finished his time there and got through his hospital degree John came back to Butler and married his daughter. It must have been about that time the Indian Mutiny broke out, just at the end of the crimean War, and medical men were wanted for the Indian Army which was considerably increased there and no doubt higher pay was given to attract docors, moreover they were in those days allowed to do privae work as well as army work. John went out and he must have had a real ...  FBP_048
ImageID:   FBP_048
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
John Bean, after leaving Haxells I do not know what other tuition he had meanwhile was apprenticed to a doctor at Colchester at a premium of £400. The doctor's name was Went and he became somehow bankrupt and there was considerable difficulty in getting back from the trustee a part of the premium. After that arrangements were made for John to go to Dr Butler at Brentwood and when he had finished his time there and got through his hospital degree John came back to Butler and married his daughter. It must have been about that time the Indian Mutiny broke out, just at the end of the crimean War, and medical men were wanted for the Indian Army which was considerably increased there and no doubt higher pay was given to attract docors, moreover they were in those days allowed to do privae work as well as army work. John went out and he must have had a real ...
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 [ John Bean contd. ]
 good time for putting two and two together as they say, he was home retired when his eldest son was 17 years old, he then was private medical attendant to Sir Bartle Frear but if he was in South Africa or India I am not sure - after that he was resident medical attendant to Sir Francis crossley at Somerleyton in Suffolk and with all this he was living retired and a widower before I was 19, at Stoneden near Ongar. He could not have made any money over a longer period than from fifteen to twenty years, yet although he lived as an army officer, gave three children eah a good education, he had saved, starting on nothing to speak of, £10,000 - Of his children, Willoughby was in his twenties when he died at sea, his daughter Jessier mared Slater in India ...  FBP_050
ImageID:   FBP_050
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
[ John Bean contd. ]
good time for "putting two and two together as they say", he was home retired when his eldest son was 17 years old, he then was private medical attendant to Sir Bartle Frear but if he was in South Africa or India I am not sure - after that he was resident medical attendant to Sir Francis crossley at Somerleyton in Suffolk and with all this he was living retired and a widower before I was 19, at Stoneden near Ongar. He could not have made any money over a longer period than from fifteen to twenty years, yet although he lived as an army officer, gave three children eah a good education, he had saved, starting on nothing to speak of, £10,000 - Of his children, Willoughby was in his twenties when he died at sea, his daughter Jessier mared "Slater" in India ...
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 [ John Bean contd ]
 Jessie married Slater in India and died there and Edwin of Brentwood Schools and Australia was seventy something when he died in Australia laving there three sons Charles, Edwin, Woodrow, John and Monty.
 William married Miss Waller of I think Stanway her father had an off hand Farm at Peldon - New Potts - William went to Cobbin End between Epping and Walham, his wife died and he afterwards took Paslow Hall in partnership with our father, this farm was over 700 acres with a brook running right through it and meadows from one end to the other, two donkeys could have almost ploughed the land which for the most part only ploughed three inches deep, it was and is an ideal grazing farm and our Father and Uncle ...  FBP_052
ImageID:   FBP_052
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
[ John Bean contd ]
Jessie married "Slater" in India and died there and Edwin of Brentwood Schools and Australia was seventy something when he died in Australia laving there three sons Charles, Edwin, Woodrow, John and Monty.
William married Miss Waller of I think Stanway her father had an off hand Farm at Peldon - New Potts - William went to Cobbin End between Epping and Walham, his wife died and he afterwards took Paslow Hall in partnership with our father, this farm was over 700 acres with a brook running right through it and meadows from one end to the other, two donkeys could have almost ploughed the land which for the most part only ploughed three inches deep, it was and is an ideal grazing farm and our Father and Uncle ...
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 [ William Bean and Paslow Hall contd ]
 only taught heavy land corn farming, they started off right and bought a herd of forty cows and put the milk on the newly opened railroad at Chipping Ongar for London. But the same year 1860-1 a fever of some sort attacked the cows and in 61 the rain came down. I was of course very young and it may have impressed me more than it ought but the thunder and lightning seemed to be a daily occurance and I remember seeing the haycocks floating down the brook - at any rate cowkeeping was scrapped and sheep were resorted to, hay was sent by road to London, the arable land was farmed in the old style, and after three years our mother was ill and father brought his family back to Mersea for a year ...  FBP_054
ImageID:   FBP_054
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
[ William Bean and Paslow Hall contd ]
only taught heavy land corn farming, they started off right and bought a herd of forty cows and put the milk on the newly opened railroad at Chipping Ongar for London. But the same year 1860-1 a fever of some sort attacked the cows and in 61 the rain came down. I was of course very young and it may have impressed me more than it ought but the thunder and lightning seemed to be a daily occurance and I remember seeing the haycocks floating down the brook - at any rate cowkeeping was scrapped and sheep were resorted to, hay was sent by road to London, the arable land was farmed in the old style, and after three years our mother was ill and father brought his family back to Mersea for a year ...
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 [ William contd ]
 at Well House and then to Peldon Hall again. Leaving William to carry on at Paslow until he died there some years later.
 Henry seems to have started with the Well House Farm at Mersea, then about 200 acres, he married Miss Emily Luigwood [ Lingwood ? ] of Colchester she and her two sisters were school teachers in a private school kept I think by their parents, one sister married Butler of Essex and Suffolk Fire Office at Chelmsford, the other Mr Martin who farmed in Yorkshire.
 Butler had a family of very nice looking daughters and Martin twin-daughters very pretty , and all these daughters had turns at Uncle Henry's while Mrs Henry tried to marry them off. Henry lived at Rose Bank and I am afraid lived up to his means by reason of those girls. When William died ...  FBP_056
ImageID:   FBP_056
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
[ William contd ]
at Well House and then to Peldon Hall again. Leaving William to carry on at Paslow until he died there some years later.
Henry seems to have started with the Well House Farm at Mersea, then about 200 acres, he married Miss Emily Luigwood [ Lingwood ? ] of Colchester she and her two sisters were school teachers in a private school kept I think by their parents, one sister married Butler of Essex and Suffolk Fire Office at Chelmsford, the other Mr Martin who farmed in Yorkshire.
Butler had a family of very nice looking daughters and Martin twin-daughters very pretty , and all these daughters had turns at Uncle Henry's while Mrs Henry tried to marry them off. Henry lived at Rose Bank and I am afraid lived up to his means by reason of those girls. When William died ...
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 [ Henry Bean contd ]
 When William died Henry had his money and moved to Ongar anc carried on the farm with help from our father until he had nothing left, when he went to live in London with Lilly Carter and Aunt Emmy.
 Willoughby lived at Peldon with his father until his father died, and for one year longer when he too died a bachelor.
 The two girls Fanny [ Frances ] and Emmy lived at Peldon with their father as well as Aunt Louisa and the boys as they grew up and the family must have been packed a bit close for I remember two additional bedrooms being built and we were fairly think then.
 Fanny married Challis Carter and lived at Copped Hall Little Wigborough. Probably she married not long befoer ...  FBP_058
ImageID:   FBP_058
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
[ Henry Bean contd ]
When William died Henry had his money and moved to Ongar anc carried on the farm with help from our father until he had nothing left, when he went to live in London with Lilly Carter and Aunt Emmy.
Willoughby lived at Peldon with his father until his father died, and for one year longer when he too died a bachelor.
The two girls Fanny [ Frances ] and Emmy lived at Peldon with their father as well as Aunt Louisa and the boys as they grew up and the family must have been packed a bit close for I remember two additional bedrooms being built and we were fairly think then.
Fanny married Challis Carter and lived at Copped Hall Little Wigborough. Probably she married not long befoer ...
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 [ Fanny Carter née Bean contd ]
 her father died and after her Aunt Louisa had died. 
 Emily or as she was always called Emmy - my earliest recollection of her she lodged in Colchester but was quite often with Aunt Fanny at Wigborough. Never married and was considered to be delicate, tall and thin, like the rest good looking, lived to be 96 years and while she nearly always went about with a shawl over he head I do not remember her being ill.
 Joseph was the youngest of Samuel Edwin's family but I will take him now before our Father, was educated for a doctor and was apprenticed to his brother John at Brentwood until he went to hospital in London, I forget which hospital it was, I remember ...  FBP_060
ImageID:   FBP_060
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
[ Fanny Carter née Bean contd ]
her father died and after her Aunt Louisa had died.
Emily or as she was always called Emmy - my earliest recollection of her she lodged in Colchester but was quite often with Aunt Fanny at Wigborough. Never married and was considered to be delicate, tall and thin, like the rest good looking, lived to be 96 years and while she nearly always went about with a shawl over he head I do not remember her being ill.
Joseph was the youngest of Samuel Edwin's family but I will take him now before our Father, was educated for a doctor and was apprenticed to his brother John at Brentwood until he went to hospital in London, I forget which hospital it was, I remember ...
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
 [ Joseph Bean contd. ]
 there is a letter from him in London saying that he had difficulty in making £7 a month pay for everything including bodies for dissection. After leaving this hospital he was house surgeon at some place up the Thames and the same in Wales and the about the same time as John he got into the Indian Army - Green the tailor of Regent St. who was either his Uncle or Cousin fitted him out with regimental uniform etc and if my recollection is right it cost £80. He married in India the daughter of one of his superior officers, I think Surgeon General White [ Emma Eliza Wood niece of Col. White - CFB ] and he died in India about 1862. I remember his widow coming to Mersea while we were at Well House and at that date with her Indian nurse ...  FBP_062
ImageID:   FBP_062
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
[ Joseph Bean contd. ]
there is a letter from him in London saying that he had difficulty in making £7 a month pay for everything including bodies for dissection. After leaving this hospital he was house surgeon at some place up the Thames and the same in Wales and the about the same time as John he got into the Indian Army - Green the tailor of Regent St. who was either his Uncle or Cousin fitted him out with regimental uniform etc and if my recollection is right it cost £80. He married in India the daughter of one of his superior officers, I think Surgeon General White [ Emma Eliza Wood niece of Col. White - CFB ] and he died in India about 1862. I remember his widow coming to Mersea while we were at Well House and at that date with her Indian nurse ...
Source:Mersea Museum
 Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean
[ visit of Eliza Bean née White contd ]
 and baby and the other child. Joseph and our father being of an age were extra fond of each other.
 I think it was the death of Willoughby that eac brother and sister was entitled to about £70 and Joseph wrote from India giving his share to his two sisters and I think the income of the two girls from their father was about £90 a year each.
</p><p>
Here W.J. Bean's recollection end.
</p>  FBP_064
ImageID:   FBP_064
Title: Bean Family History by Willoughby John Bean [ visit of Eliza Bean née White contd ]
and baby and the other child. Joseph and our father being of an age were extra fond of each other.
I think it was the death of Willoughby that eac brother and sister was entitled to about £70 and Joseph wrote from India giving his share to his two sisters and I think the income of the two girls from their father was about £90 a year each.

Here W.J. Bean's recollection end.

Source:Mersea Museum