ID CDC_TYP

TitleTyphoon aircraft salvaged from Blackwater.
Abstract

Mersea fishermen often had damaged nets from a 'fast' in the River, and eventually Mike Lungley persuaded divers to go down, see what was there, and to try and salvage it. A barge was used as a base and a number of divers were involved.

The wreck of the aircraft contained live ammunition, which was subsequently disposed of by the Military. The wreckage was brought ashore on the mud at the back of the Nass. Much of it soon deterioriated. Some bits were taken to East Essex Aviation Society Museum and Point Clear and some have found a resting place in homes on Mersea Island.

Typhoon R8895 had been forced to ditch on 22 March 1944 when the engine over-revved on take-off from RAF Bradwell Bay. The pilot, Flt Sgt R.W. Pottinger was rescued, taken to the Naval Hospital in Brightlingsea, but returned to the Squadron next day.

The colour photographs were originally taken on Brian Jay's camera.

There was an article on the Typhoon in the Regatta Programme 2005 - see REG_2005_TYP .

SourceMersea Museum / Karen Kallaby
IDCDC_TYP
Related Images:
 Colchester Diving Club salvaging Typhoon which had ditched in the River Blackwater during WW2. The boat belongs to Derek 'Dink' Ball. Ashley Upsher in orange sitting on barge. Brian Jay in diving gear with his back to the camera. In the red hood is Captain Bill King from Harwich, with his wife Mavis to the right.
 Photograph by Brian Jay.  CDC_TYP_001
ImageID:   CDC_TYP_001
Title: Colchester Diving Club salvaging Typhoon which had ditched in the River Blackwater during WW2. The boat belongs to Derek 'Dink' Ball. Ashley Upsher in orange sitting on barge. Brian Jay in diving gear with his back to the camera. In the red hood is Captain Bill King from Harwich, with his wife Mavis to the right.
Photograph by Brian Jay.
Date:1971
Source:Mersea Museum / Karen Kallaby
 Colchester Diving Club salvaging Typhoon which had ditched in the River Blackwater during WW2. The engine was brought up first. The Napier Sabre engine was sold to a farmer in Tolleshunt Knights who then gave it to Duxford.  CDC_TYP_005
ImageID:   CDC_TYP_005
Title: Colchester Diving Club salvaging Typhoon which had ditched in the River Blackwater during WW2. The engine was brought up first. The Napier Sabre engine was sold to a farmer in Tolleshunt Knights who then gave it to Duxford.
Date:1971
Source:Mersea Museum / Karen Kallaby
 Colchester Diving Club salvaging Typhoon which had ditched in the River Blackwater during WW2. A section of the wing resting on the mud. The conger eel was living in the wing.
 Typhoon No. R.8895 was based at Bradwell Bay. It ditched in the River Blackwater 22 March 1944, after the engine over-revved on take-off and the pilot could not make height. The pilot, Flt Sgt R.W. Pottinger, was rescued.
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<p>2016 - there are two heritage projects running that are dedicated to the Hawker Typhoon. <a href=http://www.hawker-typhoon.com/ target=typ>www.hawker-typhoon.com/</a> in the UK and <a href=http://www.typhoonlegacy.com/ target=typ>www.typhoonlegacy.com</a> in Canada.
</a>  CDC_TYP_019
ImageID:   CDC_TYP_019
Title: Colchester Diving Club salvaging Typhoon which had ditched in the River Blackwater during WW2. A section of the wing resting on the mud. The conger eel was living in the wing.
Typhoon No. R.8895 was based at Bradwell Bay. It ditched in the River Blackwater 22 March 1944, after the engine over-revved on take-off and the pilot could not make height. The pilot, Flt Sgt R.W. Pottinger, was rescued.

2016 - there are two heritage projects running that are dedicated to the Hawker Typhoon. www.hawker-typhoon.com/ in the UK and www.typhoonlegacy.com in Canada.

Date:1971
Source:Mersea Museum / Karen Kallaby
 Colchester Diving Club salvaging Typhoon which had ditched in the River Blackwater during WW2.
 Letter from Ministry of Defence to M.D. Lungley, 68 St Peters Road, 6 September 1971.
 ...
 The aircraft in question was Typhoon serial number R.8895 belonging to No. 3 Squadron based at Bradwell Bay. The pilot was Flt Sgt R.W. Pottinger, and the accident occurred on 22 March 1944 - some couple of years later than apparently thought locally. It was not in fact shot down, but ditched by the pilot. The Squadron record states that the engine over-revved on take-off for dark night-flying practice. The pilot could not make height and was forced to ditch in the Blackwater. This was done successfully, but the pilot had difficulty in working his dinghy owing to the cold. Boats from Brightlingsea located him, with the assistance of flares dropped by an Albacore from Manston, and he was taken to the Naval Hospital at Brightlingsea where he stayed the night. He rejoined his Squadron the following day none the worse for his adventure.
 
 
It is confirmed that the aircraft was moved recently to a less dangerous position and de-armed by the Military Authorities.
  
You may be interested to know that Flt Sgt Pottinger was later commissioned and was released from the RAF in 1945 with the Rank of Flying Officer. His personal number was 182715.
 ...  CDC_TYP_031
ImageID:   CDC_TYP_031
Title: Colchester Diving Club salvaging Typhoon which had ditched in the River Blackwater during WW2.
Letter from Ministry of Defence to M.D. Lungley, 68 St Peters Road, 6 September 1971.
...
The aircraft in question was Typhoon serial number R.8895 belonging to No. 3 Squadron based at Bradwell Bay. The pilot was Flt Sgt R.W. Pottinger, and the accident occurred on 22 March 1944 - some couple of years later than apparently thought locally. It was not in fact shot down, but ditched by the pilot. The Squadron record states that the engine over-revved on take-off for dark night-flying practice. The pilot could not make height and was forced to ditch in the Blackwater. This was done successfully, but the pilot had difficulty in working his dinghy owing to the cold. Boats from Brightlingsea located him, with the assistance of flares dropped by an Albacore from Manston, and he was taken to the Naval Hospital at Brightlingsea where he stayed the night. He rejoined his Squadron the following day none the worse for his adventure.

It is confirmed that the aircraft was moved recently to a less dangerous position and de-armed by the Military Authorities.

You may be interested to know that Flt Sgt Pottinger was later commissioned and was released from the RAF in 1945 with the Rank of Flying Officer. His personal number was 182715.
...
Date:1971
Source:Mersea Museum / Karen Kallaby