Great Wigborough in 1831 - Wright and Bartlett

GREAT WIGBOROUGH
from The History and Topography of the County of Essex by Thos. Wright and W. Bartlett, Volume 2, pages 736 to 738. [ MST_BV1 ]

Great This is the largest of the two parishes of this name; in records written, Weigheberga, Wigheberga, Wigberwe, Wykebyrh. The Saxon [....], a battle; [....], or [....], a fort; may, as is supposed, have been the original name. There have, undoubtedly, been engagements between the ancient inhabitants and piratical invaders in this neighbourhood; and the remains of a tumulus, near the church of Great Wigborough, may mark the burial-place of men slain in battle. Great Wigborough contains about two thousand acres of land ; the village is on the road between Maldon and Colchester ; from the latter place distant eight miles, and from London forty-six. [ Note 1 ]

A portion of this parish belonged to the nunnery of Barking, before and after the Conquest; and Aluric, a Saxon freeman, had another part, which was in the possession of Hugh de St. Quintin, at the time of the survey. There were, therefore, two manors.

The mansion of Abbots', or Abbess'-hall, is a large ancient building, a mile southwest from the church, and not far from Salcot Virli. This estate belonged to the celleresse of the nunnery of Barking, [ Note 2 ] and continued in that house, or in the priory of St. Osyth, till the dissolution of monasteries; when, in 1540, it was granted, by Henry the eighth, to Thomas lord Cromwell; from whom, again passing to the crown, it was included in the estates appropriated to the maintenance of the princess Mary, afterwards queen. In 1545 king Henry granted it to Charles Tuke, esq.; and, on his death, in 1547, his heir was his son, George Tuke, esq. In 1562, queen Elizabeth granted this estate to Thomas Howard, duke of Norfolk; on whose arraignment and execution, this and his other estates were confiscated; but, in 1597, was, by queen Elizabeth, restored to his second son, Thomas, baron Howard of Walden, created earl of Suffolk in 1603. [ Note 3 ] Dying in 1626, he was succeeded by his eldest son and heir, Theophilus, earl of Suffolk; who died in 1640, leaving this estate to his eldest son and heir, James Howard, earl of Suffolk; and he, in 1647, sold it to Chaloner Chute, esq., and John Aylett, gent., of Fering, together with the manor of Salcote, in Wigborough; and it was afterwards conveyed, by John Aylett, to sir Mark Guyon, of Coggeshall, knt., who presented to the rectory in 1688 ; and he bequeathed it, by will, In 1689, to his son William; and if he died without issue male, to his two daughters, Elizabeth and Rachel. Elizabeth became the wife of Edward Bullock, esq., of Falkborne hall, and died in childbed, as did also her child, within the month. The other daughter, Rachel, was married to Thomas Guyon, esq., and afterwards to John Bullock, esq., of Dynes hall, in Great Maplested, younger brother of the said Edward: they had issue, John, who did not marry, and Rachel, who also died unmarried, and without a will, in 1765, when her real estates descended to her kinsman and heir-at-law, John Bullock, esq., of Falkborn hall; and it now belongs to his descendants.

The mansion of the estate of Abbots' Wic is in this parish, but the lands extend into Salcot Verli. It belonged, in 1645, to colonel Thornhill; and afterwards to Mrs. Crank.

The manor-house of Mulsham, or Moulsham, is near the church, on the north-east. Aluric, a freeman, had this estate in the time of Edward the Confessor; and at the survey it belonged to Hugh de St. Quintin. Afterwards it was holden of the honour of Mandeville, by the families of Patteshull, [ Note 4 ] Att Lee, Barle, and Leven- thorp. Part of this estate belonged to sir John Peake, lord mayor of London in 1687; and his only daughter, Margery, conveyed it to her husband, sir John Shaw, bart., [ Note 5 ] of Eltham, who died in 1721, leaving his son John heir to his title and estates; who, in 1716, married Anna Maria, one of the daughters and co-heiresses of sir Thomas Barnardiston, bart., of Kedington hall, in Suffolk, and dying in 1739, was succeeded by his only son, sir John Shaw, bart. A third part of this estate belonged to John Wale, esq., of Calne priory.

The church is on a hill of considerable height, commanding an extensive prospect toward the sea, and on the coast, and in every direction. It is dedicated to St. Stephen. [ Note 6 ] Salcot Wigborough is a hamlet to Great Wigborough ; and there is a pound near the church, which belongs to the lord of that manor: the name is supposed to have originated from salt-works, mentioned in records as having been in the neighbouring parish of Peldon, to which the sea-water might be conveyed from Pyefleet creek by this place, where, as the name seems to indicate, there might at that time be a "store-house." Though now a poor decayed village, this has probably been, as reported, the chief, or only town, in the parish. There is a fair here on the 24th of August.

The church is a good lofty building, near the creek, opposite to Salcot Verli. It has a nave and chancel, of one pace, and is a much more considerable and handsomer building than the other church, to which it is a chapel. Formerly there was a chantry here, well endowed.

The population of this parish amounted to four hundred and ten in 1821, and had increased to four hundred and thirty-four in 1831.

Note 1. Soil of the Wigboroughs: a strong tenacious loam, of a rich brown colour, to the depth of six or seven feet. There are no springs. Hollow draining useless. Expense of working very great; but the crops heavy. Average annual produce per acre ; wheat twenty-four, barley thirty-two bushels.
Note 2. Monast. Angl. vol. i. p. 80.
Note 3. Dugdale's Baron, vol. ii. p. 276. Newcourt, vol. ii. p. 663.
Note 4. Arms of Pateshull .- Argent, a fesse, between three crescents, sable. On the roof of Salcot Wig- borough church.
Note 5. His father, sir John Shaw, knt., created a baronet in 1665, proved a faithful subject and true friend to king Charles the second, in his exile, sending him large sums of money to Brussels and Antwerp, when there appeared little or no probability of his restoration. He was, in consequence, favoured with a seat in parliament, without the trouble and expense of a canvass; and also, besides the dignity of a baronet, had the profitable place of being one of the collectors of the customs. His family had estates at Birch, and other parts of this county.

Author: Thos. Wright and W. Bartlett
March 1831

Related Images

 History and Topography of County of Essex 1831. Page 738
 Hundred of Winstee
 Peldon contd.
 Great Wigborough
 For a transcription of the Great Wigborough pages see <a href=mmresdetails.php?col=MM&ba=cke&typ=ID&rhit=1&pid=MBK_BV2_GWG ID=1>MBK_BV2_GWG </a>
</p>  MBK_BV2_P738MBK_BV2_P738
History and Topography of County of Essex 1831. Page 738
Hundred of Winstee
Peldon contd.
Great Wigborough
For a transcription of the Great Wigborough pages see MBK_BV2_GWG


March 1831
 History and Topography of County of Essex 1831. Page 739
 Hundred of Winstree
 Great Wigborough contd.
 For a transcription of the Great Wigborough pages see <a href=mmresdetails.php?col=MM&ba=cke&typ=ID&rhit=1&pid=MBK_BV2_GWG ID=1>MBK_BV2_GWG </a>
</p>  MBK_BV2_P739MBK_BV2_P739
History and Topography of County of Essex 1831. Page 739
Hundred of Winstree
Great Wigborough contd.
For a transcription of the Great Wigborough pages see MBK_BV2_GWG


March 1831
ID: MBK_BV2_GWG
Source: Mersea Museum